Sian Proctor: A Fast Farewell!, July 22, 2017


NOAA Teacher at Sea

Sian Proctor

Aboard Oscar Dyson

7/2/2017-7/22/2017

Mission: Gulf of Alaska Pollock Survey

Geographic Area of Cruise: Gulf of Alaska

Date: July 22, 2017

Me Back in Kodiak

Me Back in Kodiak, Alaska

Life at sea can often be unpredictable. When I started my 4am shift I learned that we were having issues with the main engine on the NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson and had to return to Kodiak. This cut my adventure at sea down to just two weeks instead of three. An unexpected bonus from returning to Kodiak was getting to visit the Kodiak Fisheries Research Center.

Science and Technology Log: Kodiak Fisheries Research Center

The Kodiak Fisheries Research Center was built in 1998 using funds from the Exxon-Valdez Oil Spill (1989). The purpose of the center is to provide educational information about the wildlife, marine life, commercial fishing resources and fisheries research programs on the island. Click this link for more information: KFRC

Interview with Kresimir Williams

Fisheries Biologist

Kresimir in the Acoustics Lab

Kresimir in the Acoustics Lab Image from TAS Mary Murrian

  • Official Title
    • Fisheries Biologist
  • Normal Job Duties
    • On this cruise, I am responsible for collecting physical measurements of fish caught in our science trawls, as well as providing support for various acoustic and camera instruments we’re putting in the water.
  •  How long have you been working on Oscar Dyson?
    • Since it’s first science cruise in 2005, but only for a few weeks each year.
  • Why the ocean? What made you choose a career at sea?
    • I got hooked on sea exploration at an early age spending summers on the Croatian coast, snorkeling, fishing, and riding boats. The ocean represents an exploration opportunity that is more “accessible” to us, unlike the deep jungles or space. The edge of our knowledge is never very far in the marine environment. The more time I spend in ocean research, there always seem to many more questions than answers.
  • What is your favorite thing about going to sea on Oscar Dyson?
    • I enjoy the scientific challenges and the things that are new each cruise, whether it is some unique types of fish we encounter, or new ways of exploring the sea, such as new instrumentation. There always seem to be new things to see, even after being on these cruises for 15 years. And there are also new people on board that are interesting to meet, people with new perspectives and ideas.
  • Why is your work (or research) important?
    • There is a basic component to the work of essentially performing a marine “census” that is the backbone of resource management for the important fisheries that take place here. We have to have good information on the state of the fish populations in order to properly manage sustainable fish harvests. But the results of our surveys also provide essential data for many studies of the ocean, such as climate related fish distributions, questions of fish biology, and marine ecosystem functioning – critical research efforts that are carried on by academic and government researchers. On top of all that, we also do a lot of research into our survey methods, to develop new ways of collecting data and to determine the precision and accuracy of the tools we use. This latter part is more interesting to me.
  • When did you know you wanted to pursue a career in science or an ocean career?
    • I was interested in all things oceanic from an early age. I always wanted to work specifically with fish. My toddler doodles were of fish. I’ve followed this path throughout my education and job history, and have no regrets.
  • What part of your job with NOAA (or contracted to NOAA) did you least expect to be doing?
    • On the job I somewhat unexpectedly learned how to write computer programs, and to develop and design camera systems. But this is also a very rewarding activity for me.
  • What are some of the challenges with your job?
    • As we incorporate more and more advanced technology into our work, trying to keep all of the systems operational requires a broad base of knowledge, spanning from computer networks, underwater optics, electronics, and engineering that can be a little beyond my background. So this is a challenge for me to keep myself up to speed on these aspects of the work and keep our instruments and cameras running smoothly. Also, as scientists we are obligated to share our work with others, which means writing papers and making presentations, which can be a challenge.
  • What are some of the rewards with your job?
    • I love discovering new ways of collecting data in the environment, and understanding how fish behavior influences our ability to observe them. Finding answers to research questions relating to these areas is a very rewarding experience for me. There are distinct moments, not very often encountered even in entire careers, when you know that you have found something, possibly something completely new, that produces an excitement that is almost difficult to describe.
  • Describe a memorable moment at sea.
    • A positive memorable moment would be when we first started operating cameras inside the trawl and were able to distinguish how fish behaved within the trawl for the first time. The first few tows with the new camera equipment were very exciting. A negative memorable moment: We did run out of coffee on a cruise in the Bering sea a few years ago. Bad scene.

Interview with Caroline Wilkinson

NOAA Corps Junior Officer

NOAA Corps Officer Caroline Wilkinson

NOAA Corps Officer Caroline Wilkinson

  • Official Title
    • Junior Officer
  • Normal Job Duties
    • Standing bridge watch 8 hours a day, often with a Officer of the Deck in training. As Environmental compliance officer- ensuring the ship meets all required environmental standards for garbage disposal, discharge, etc. As medical officer- ensuring all personnel are physically and mentally fit for sea duty, keeping the hospital clean, tidy, and stocked, responding to medical emergencies at sea. As Imprest officer- maintaining our cash fund and reimbursing crew for missed meals. As Navigation officer- planning our route and ensuring the charts and electronic navigation reflects our intended tracklines.
  •  How long have you been working on Oscar Dyson?
    • Since December 2015
  • Why the ocean? What made you choose a career at sea?
    • I grew up spending summers on Long Island Sound and fell in love with the beach and the smell of the ocean.
  • What is your favorite thing about going to sea on Oscar Dyson?
    • The amazing animals, land masses, and weather phenomenon that we get to experience.
  • Why is your work (or research) important?
    • The work I do facilitates the scientists ability to collect the necessary data to ensure the pollock population remains sustainable.
  • When did you know you wanted to pursue a career in science or an ocean career?
    • As a child, I spent a lot of time out doors looking for bugs and critters; a career in science seemed like a natural next step.
  • What part of your job with NOAA (or contracted to NOAA) did you least expect to be doing?
    • I didn’t expect there to be so much paperwork involved with driving the ship!
  • What are some of the challenges with your job?
    • The long stints away from friends, family, and civilization.
  • What are some of the rewards with your job?
    • Meeting a variety of incredibly smart and talented people and exploring parts of Alaska most people don’t get to experience.
  • Describe a memorable moment at sea.
    • Being in the northern Gulf of Alaska at night and spending hours watching the northern lights dance across the sky.

Personal Log

Here is a quick video tribute to the NOAA Teacher at Sea program, the NOAA scientists and Oscar Dyson officers and crew. Thank you!

Education Tidbit: 

I have one more NOAA website to share with you. It is a great resource for students who are doing a paper on a particular fish. I use the NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center page and information on pollock as my example.

Did You Know?

That the NOAA Teacher at Sea Program has been around for over 25 years! You can learn more about the program by   clicking this link: NOAA Teacher At Sea

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