Maggie Prevenas, May 2, 2007


NOAA Teacher at Sea
Maggie Prevenas
Onboard US Coast Guard Ship Healy
April 20 – May 15, 2007

Mission: Bering Sea Ecosystem Survey
Geographic Region: Alaska
Date: May 2, 2007

Science Log

We did an experiment a few weeks back. Our students decorated Styrofoam balls, bowls and cups. We asked them to predict what they thought would happen to the object if we sent it down to the bottom of the deep Bering Sea.

Some thought it would expand and become huge, others thought it might be crushed. Still others thought nothing would happen.

So one late Saturday night and super early Sunday morning we strapped the materials to the CTD rosette and let it drop down down down.

Something happened all right.

The opportunity came to us from the St. Paul students to do the experiment again.

The opportunity came to us from the St. Paul students to do the experiment again.

So when the opportunity came to us from the St. Paul students to do the experiment again using cups that they decorated, we were ready. I gathered them up from teacher Tonia Kushin, tucked them into my backpack and counted the days until I would send them to the deep deep deep.

The cups have been sent to the deep deep deep.

The cups have been sent to the deep deep deep.

Today is the day. We have gathered them together and stuffed each one with two paper towels so that the cups won’t piggy back into each other. I have deposited them in a mesh laundry bag with Scott Hiller, oceanographer supreme-o, and rest assured they will be strapped to the next CTD down.

And now we wait.

At 60 meters per minute, why not calculate how many minutes it will take to go down 3000 feet and then back up. That’s your assignment for today.

You’ll have to wait for tomorrow’s log to find out what happens.