Ashley Cosme: Deploying a Longline – September 4, 2018


NOAA Teacher at Sea

Ashley Cosme

Aboard NOAA Ship Oregon II

August 31 – September 14, 2018

 

Mission: Shark/Red Snapper Longline Survey

Geographic Area of Cruise: Gulf of Mexico

Date:  September 4th, 2018

Longline sites

Primary longline stations are indicated in purple. The red line represents the path the Oregon II.

Weather Data from the Bridge:

  • Latitude: 28 02.2N
  • Longitude: 96 23.8W
  • Wind speed: 13 Knots
  • Wind direction: 080 (from North)
  • Sky cover: Broken
  • Visibility: 10 miles
  • Barometric pressure:  1014.1atm
  • Sea wave height: 2 feet
  • Sea Water Temp: 30.6°C
  • Dry Bulb: 28.1°C
  • Wet Bulb: 25.3°C

 

Science and Technology Log:

After a long two day cruise to the southern tip of Texas, we finally started fishing.  I learned quickly that everyone has a job, and when you are done with your job, you help members of your team complete their tasks.  The coordinates of all of the survey locations are charted using a program called Novel Tec, and once the captain has determined that we have reached our designated location, the fun begins.  To deploy the longline there are many important responsibilities that are delegated by the Chief NOAA Scientist.

Baited hooks

Baited hooks

 

#1- All scientists work together to bait 100 hooks with mackerel (Scomber scombrus).

 

 

 

 

 

High Flyer

High-Flyer deployment

 

 

 

#2- High-Flyer Release – Once the long line has been attached to the high-flyer, it is released from the stern of the boat.  The high-flyer consists of a buoy to keep it above water, and a flashing light, so we know the exact location of the beginning of the longline.

 

 

 

 

 

Attaching a weight

Attaching a weight and TDR

 

#3 Weight Attachment – A NOAA fisherman is responsible for attaching the weight at the appropriate distance, based on the depth of that station to ensure the gear is on the sea floor.  This  also keeps the high-flyer from drifting.  Alongside the weight, a TDR is attached to the line, which records temperature and depth.

 

 

 

numbered hooks

Each baited hook is identified with a number.

 

 

 

#4 Numbering of baited hooks – After the first weight goes out, one by one the gangions are numbered and set over the edge of the ship, but not let go.  A gangion consists of a 12ft line, a baited hook, and hook number.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attaching the Hooks

Attaching the Hooks

# 5 Hook Attachment – A NOAA fisherman will receive one gangion at a time, and attach it to the line.  Another weight is attached to the line after 50 hooks have been deployed, and once all 100 hooks are deployed the final weight is attached.  Then the line is cut, and the second high-flyer is attached and set free to mark the end of the survey area.  This process goes fairly quickly, as the longline is continuously being fed into the water.

 

Data Collection

Data Collection

 

#6 Data Collection – Each piece of equipment that enters the water is recorded in a database on the computer.  There should always be 2 high-flyers, 3 weights, and 100 gangions entered into the database.

 

 

 

 

 

Scrubbing buckets

Scrubbing buckets

 

 

 

#7 Bucket Clean-up – The buckets that were holding the baited hooks need to be scrubbed and prepared for when we haul the line back in.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once all of the gear is in the water we wait for approximately one hour until we start to haul back each hook one by one.  The anticipation is exciting to see if a shark or other fish has hooked itself.

Longline Fishing infographic

This image illustrates what the longline, including all the gear, would look like once completely placed in the water. (Image courtesy of Stephan Kade, 2018 Teacher at Sea).

 

Personal Log

I would say that my body has fully adjusted to living at sea.  I took off my sea sickness patch and I feel great!  Currently, Tropical Storm Gordon is nearing to hit Mississippi this evening.  We are far enough out of the storm’s path that it will not affect our fishing track.  I am having the time of my life and learning so much about the Oregon II, sharks, and many other organisms that we’ve seen or caught.

Remora

This sharksucker (Echeneis nautratus) was sucking on a blacktip shark that we caught. He instantly attached to my arm to complete his duty as a cleaner fish.

Did you know?:

Engineers.jpg

William Osborn (1st Engineer) and Fred Abaka (3rd Engineer).

NOAA Ship Oregon II creates freshwater via reverse osmosis.  Sea water is pumped in and passed through a high pressure pump at 1,000psi.  The pump contains a membrane (filter), which salt is too big to pass through, so it is disposed overboard.  The clean freshwater is collected and can be used for showering, cooking, and drinking.  In addition to creating freshwater, the engineers are also responsible for the two engines and the generators.

 

 

 

Animals Seen:

Pantropical Spotted dolphins (Stenella attenuate)

Blacknose Shark (Carcharhinus acronotus)

Sharpnose Shark (Rhizoprionodon terraenovae)

Smoothhound Dogfish (Mustelus sinusmexicanus)

Blacktip Shark (Carcharhinus limbatus)

Red Snapper (Lutjanus campechanus)

Sharksucker (Echeneis nautratus)

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