Patricia Schromen, August 20, 2009


NOAA Teacher at Sea
Patricia Schromen
Onboard NOAA Ship Miller Freeman
August 19-24, 2009 

Mission: Hake Survey
Geographical Area: Northwest Pacific Coast
Date: Thursday, August 20, 2009

Ensign Heather Moe coming aboard the Miller Freeman in Port Angeles, Washington

Ensign Heather Moe coming aboard the Miller Freeman in Port Angeles, Washington

Weather Data from the Bridge 
SW wind 10 knots
Wind waves 1 or 2 feet with swell 6 feet at 10 seconds
17 degrees Celsius
Areas of fog

Science and Technology Log 

The Miller Freeman docked in the Port Angeles harbor two days earlier than scheduled. Repair was needed on the trawling net reel. Then the bow thruster wasn’t cooperating on Tuesday so departure was delayed until Wednesday. Once at sea, the ship must be self reliant 24 hours a day seven days a week.  Everyone and everything work together.  Team work and cooperation are critical. Many different careers are on board.  Smooth operation of the Miller Freeman relies on each department performing specific assignments.  Some of these departments are:

  • NOAA Corps- commissioned officers who pilot the ship
  • Scientists-oceanographers, fisheries biologists and data analysts
  • Deck Dept.-maintain the ship and launch the survey equipment
  • Engineering Dept.-operate all ships mechanical systems
  • Steward Dept.-prepare meals
  • Electronics Technician – manages ship’s computers and network
  • Survey Department – assist the scientists with data collection and equipment

Some people have PhDs while others may have acquired skills from on the job training.  Most people seem to like the challenge of solving problems like how to weld an extra guide stick with the materials on board or how to map the course to the fishing transects. The opportunities seem as endless as the vast waters of the ocean.

Personal Log 

During our safety drill, I grab these essentials from my stateroom and muster, or go to the upper deck.

During our safety drill, I grab these essentials from my stateroom and muster, or go to the upper deck.

Learning my way around the ship is one of my first tasks and everyone has been so very helpful. There are many hatches and steep ladders (stairs) to the different decks. Safety includes knowing how to exit quickly and how to put on a life suit in less than one minute.  Like a fire drill at school we will have a fire or abandon ship drill sometime today. When I hear the ship’s alarm I must go to my stateroom, grab 4 things:  my life preserver, bag with life suit, long sleeve shirt and hat then muster to the lab deck. There I slip off my shoes, shake the suit out of the bag, lay it out, sit in the middle, wiggle my legs in, kneel down, put in my left arm, pull up the hat, put in my right arm, arch my back and zip it up to my nose. With clear “how to” directions and practice given by my chief scientist, Larry Hufnagle, I’m ready for the mandatory drill.

Question of the Day 
Why would you rather load a ship at high tide?

Something to Think About 
When I departed the ship in the evening I had to walk down the gang plank but when I returned the next morning the gang plank was level.  I only had to walk straight across to board the ship.  The ship was at the exact same dock and no one moved the gang plank. What variable made the angle of the gang plank change?

Deck crew preparing to load gang plank Tuesday afternoon, 3:30 pm

Deck crew preparing to load gang plank Tuesday afternoon, 3:30 pm

This life suit looks like a good fit for me.

This life suit looks like a good fit for me.

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