Jillian Worssam, July 28, 2008


NOAA Teacher at Sea
Jillian Worssam
Onboard U.S. Coast Guard Vessel Healy
July 1 – 30, 2008

Mission: Bering Sea Ecosystem Survey
Geographic Region: Bering Sea, Alaska
Date: July 28, 2008

Today will be the last installment of my meet the crew Monday.  There are so many people that I would love to interview and share in this forum, but there is just not enough time in the day.

To start today we have MK1 Allan Whiting, and an amazing list of responsibilities he and his department have on board.  MK stands for machinery technician, and is within the engineering division. Allan’s “A gang” is responsible for EVERYTHING that doesn’t move the ship, thus auxiliary equipment, refrigeration, cranes, hydraulics, water (can make up to 8000 gallons of drinking water a day), winches, therefor a lot of responsibility.

Working on refrigeration is only one part of his job!

Working on refrigeration is only one part of his job!

I think I have previously talked about the scientists as being a web of different fields that drive a bigger picture of how this entire Bering Sea Shelf Ecosystem is changing and adapting with global climate differences.  Well the vessel is not too dissimilar.  Each person, each division is a vital link to the effective and smooth running of the ship, and if the vessel didn’t work, neither would the scientists.

Another responsibility for the “A gang” is the transfer of the starting 1.3 million gallons of fuel from storage tanks while we are underway.  These “A Gang” members are the “FOWK’s” of the vessel; Fuel, Oil, Water, Kings,” and out technical gurus should any fuel casualty occur.  So as you can tell a lot of responsibility with this department.

Where Allan is a lead with the “A Gang,” EM1 Hans Shaffer works with all things wires.  Yes, he is one of our electrical specialists and if it generates, or uses power Hans is part of the team that is responsible for making sure it works.  From all monitoring systems, to the propulsion and even lighting systems, without the electricians the ship wouldn’t move.

While working on the cyclo-converter I stood way back!

While working on the cyclo-converter I stood way back!

Hans also works with the cyclo-converters, and I must be honest, I know that they take 1444 volts at 60 hrtz and convert it to usable power, but that is about all.  This technology is one that I have never studied.  It is a shocking shame I am not more wired in on the intricacies of electricity.  All I know is this electricity is directly proportional to the speed of the propellers and for a vessel, propeller speed is very important.

I usually do only two people on my meet the Crew Mondays, but today I would like to add two more individuals into the mix.  There is camaraderie on this vessel that is amazing, it really is a family.  And a family that exponentially doubles every thirty days or so with the advent of the scientists, yet still all are welcome.  Smiles abound and I have not once felt unwelcome.

FN Angela Ford learning how to operate the winches with excellent guidance from MST1 Chuck Bartlett.

FN Angela Ford learning how to operate the winches with excellent guidance from MST1 Chuck Bartlett.

FN Angela Ford is one of those people who always has a smile, and who appears to always be learning new skills.  Angela started out in the deck department, and then transferred to engineering (which I have heard is a bit difficult to do).  Angela is also studying to get rated as an YN3, Yeoman third class.  If you see Angela she is either studying, doing rounds with engineering or learning new components of the vessel.  Yesterday while in Aft-Con Angela was supported by the MST crew and took a hand at running the winch to deploy and retrieve the CTD, it was great to watch.  Under the guidance of MST1 Chuck Bartlett, Angela jumped right in, ready to learn something new.  As an educator I was not only impressed with her desire to learn, but Chuck’s patience in teaching.  The whole experience was an educational gift!

XO Commander Bateman teaching me how to make a delicious pie.

XO Commander Bateman teaching me how to make a delicious pie.

Unfortunately I could not stay too long, because I had my own educational experience waiting for me.  The XO, Commander Dale Bateman was preparing to give me a lesson in making a Chocolate French Silk Pie.  Ok, get that smile off your face, because, well, let me tell you, it was one of the tastiest lessons I have had in a while.

For those interested here is the recipe:

(multiply all ingredients times 3 for a standard pie crust)

½ cup butter

½ cup sugar

1 oz chocolate

1 egg

A smidgen of brown sugar

A splash of vanilla

To make this recipe, you first construct a pie crust, then in a mixer blend the butter and sugar.  According to the XO, you can never blend too much.  Add the chocolate and blend, add the eggs and blend some more.  To be precise once all the ingredients are in the bowl blend for at least 15 more minutes, you want this no bake wonder to be frothy and smooth.  Place in a refrigerator over night, and in two hours I will be able to get a piece of our masterpiece, and let you know how the finished product tastes.

Meet 1C Jennifer Peterson a senior at the Coast Guard Academy and MK3 Betty Brown, always smiling these two are.

Meet 1C Jennifer Peterson a senior at the Coast Guard Academy and MK3 Betty Brown, always smiling these two are.

I would like to add a special thanks to all those who participated in the webinar today.  It was wonderful to hear your voices, and even better to share with you this amazing adventure of discovery I have been fortunate enough to experience, thank you!

Quote of the Day:  Since water still flows, though we cut it with swords.  And sorrow returns, though we drown it with wine, since the world in no way answers to our craving, I will loosen my hair tomorrow and take to a fishing boat. – Li Po

FOR MY STUDENTS:  Are you prepared for school in two weeks?