Spencer Cody: NOAA Careers, June 10, 2014

NOAA Teacher at Sea

Spencer Cody

Aboard NOAA Ship Pisces

May 27 – June 11, 2014

Geographical Area of Cruise:  Gulf of Mexico
Mission:  SEAMAP Reef Fish Survey
Date:  June 10, 2014
 
Observational Data:
Latitude:  28˚ 4.545 N
Longitude:  90˚ 43.557 W
Air Temp: 28.4˚C (83.1˚F)
Water Temp: 25.4˚C (77.7˚F)
Ocean Depth:  148.0 m (486 ft.)
Relative Humidity:  80%
Wind Speed:  11.8 kts (13.6 mph)
Barometer:  1,011.1 hPa (1,011.1 mbar)

Science and Technology Log:

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Adria McClain, a survey technician, works on meteorological and oceanographic data collection in the acoustics lab.

It takes many different types of skill sets with many different types of backgrounds to make a NOAA mission like this a success.  Since it takes all kinds of people to get the job done, NOAA needs people with all of these backgrounds working together as a team for a common goal.  Maybe a NOAA career is in your future?

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Physical scientist Joe Tegeder is tracking the progress of one of the night-long mapping missions. Since the mapping grids commonly resemble a tightly-knit zig-zag of mapping trails, they are commonly referred to as “mowing the lawn.” Such a pattern is needed in order to properly map a given area.

Do you have an interest in meteorology or oceanography?  If so, NOAA needs you!  Meet Adria McClain; Adria is a survey technician who is responsible for collecting meteorological and oceanographic data and managing and maintaining the databases that store these observations.  She also helps integrate the Pisces’ system resources with each visiting science party.  She has an undergraduate degree in biology, a masters in physical oceanography and meteorology.  She was on active duty in the Navy for 10 years with the Meteorology and Oceanography Community or METOC.  During those ten years, she served two tours with the Naval Oceanographic Office where she was a hydrographer using sonar to make nautical charts for the Department of Defense.  She also served one tour at the Fleet Numerical Meteorology and Oceanography Center where she developed atmospheric and ocean models.  She states that she very much likes her job even though she still has a lot to learn about fish and fishery biology since she does not have a background in those areas.

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Lead fisherman Joe Flora is maintaining the weather deck by power washing surfaces. An advanced ship like the Pisces is a major investment in science and must be carefully maintained for future use.

Do you have an interest in the physical sciences and mapping?  If so, NOAA needs you!  Meet Joe Tegeder; Joe is a physical scientist who is responsible for using the acoustics equipment onboard specifically the ME-70 and the EK-60 in order to map fish habitat on the ocean bottom.  He has both an undergraduate and graduate degree in marine science.  He currently works for the Pacific Hydrographic Branch for NOAA where he primarily works with updating nautical charts in the U.S. waters of the Pacific.  Previously, he worked for the Naval Oceanographic Office where he helped map out harbors from around the world to develop anti-mining operations for possible future military missions.

Do you have an interest in doing the hands-on operational work required to carry out fisheries science?  If so, NOAA needs you!  Meet Joe Flora; Joe is the lead fisherman onboard the Pisces.  He helps implement all of the operational aspects of science missions by launching and retrieving science equipment, operating bandit reels, and cleaning and maintaining the ship in general.  He was with the Military Sealift Command for eight years where he worked on refueling ships and transport operations involving cargo and ammunition.  For the last nine years, he has worked in NOAA onboard the ships Thomas Jefferson, Gordon Gunter, and the Pisces.  He has been on the Pisces for six years.

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NOAA Corps officers are manning the bridge overseeing operations and ship resources. From left to right:  Ensign Johnson, Commander Fischel, and Lieutenant Commander Mowitt.

Do you have an interest in hands-on science and exploration?  If so, NOAA needs you!  Meet the NOAA Corps; they navigate the ship, allocate and coordinate the ship’s resources with the crew and the embarking science party, and most importantly make sure all hands are kept out of harm’s way by implementing proper safety procedures and protocols.  They bring all of the component parts together for a successful mission and try to make it as functional and as successful as possible.  Applicants to the NOAA Corps must possess a minimum of a four year degree with a minimum of 48 semester hours in science, math, or engineering coursework.  All of the officers onboard the Pisces have one thing in common:  they have a background in science, mostly biology and marine biology.  They also had to complete Basic Officer Training Classes after which they reported to a NOAA ship to serve onboard for two years where they learned watch duties and various other collateral duties along with all of the ship’s systems and operations.  In addition to assigned duties, they needed to know how to deploy and recover a diverse array of equipment including fishing gear, oceanographic instrumentation, sonar devices, and underwater cameras.  I could tell right away on the cruise that the officers had an inherent interest in science since they were always dropping in to see what we were working on exhibiting a genuine curiosity in the science that was going on.  NOAA officers are rotated out of their work positions spending a certain period of time out to sea and on land in varying geographical areas with alternating assignments.  This gives them a well-rounded experience in many aspects of NOAA’s mission.

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Members of the science party processing and recording fish specimens in the wet lab. Pictured from left to right are Paul Felts, John Moser, Adam Pollack, and Harriet Nash.

Do you have an interest in working with food preparation and presentation?  If so, NOAA needs you!  Meet Moises Martinez and Mark Potter; Moises is the chief steward.  His responsibilities include making sure there is enough storage for food, linens, and toiletries.  He is also responsible for hospitality onboard the ship and cleaning of the galley and mess.  He works with the second cook to preplan menus, but he really tries to take requests from the scientists and crew and responds accordingly.  He knows that there is not as much to do at sea during downtime as on land; so, he appreciates how much people look forward toward their meals; he tries to make everyone happy when possible.  He was in the Navy for eight years where he realized his interest in preparing food.  Later he worked two years in Italy with the Military Sealift Command as a cook and a baker.  When he came back to the United States, he found out that NOAA was trying to contact him to see if he was still interested in working for them.  He found this to be surprising since he had forgotten that he had applied through NOAA before he left for Italy two years prior.  He started out as a second cook for NOAA and has worked his way up the last six years.  Meet Mark; he is the second cook onboard the Pisces.  His responsibilities include cleaning, preparing food, cooking, and restocking.  He used to work in computer servicing but had to make a career change due to the economic downturn.  He liked preparing food; so, he decided to go back to school.  He went to Great Lakes Culinary Institute in Traverse City, Michigan, where he worked with some world class chefs to learn what he needed to know in order to work onboard the Pisces.  Prior to his assignment on the Pisces, he worked on freighters and research vessels in the Great Lakes for a couple of years.

Do you have an interest in engineering and mechanical systems?  If so, NOAA needs you!  Meet Jake DeMello; Jake is the chief engineer for the Pisces.  His responsibilities include maintaining any mechanical, propulsion, or electrical system.  He works to ensure that these systems are running safely and efficiently.  He has worked for NOAA for six years.  Prior to NOAA he worked in engineering on cruise ships and tankers.  He has a BA in marine engineering from the California Maritime Academy and is licensed as an unlimited chief engineer through the Coast Guard.

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The science party’s chief scientist, Kevin Rademacher, is coordinating from the dry lab a camera array drop with the bridge and the crew out on the weather deck.

Do you have an interest in science?  If so, NOAA needs you!  Meet the fishery research biologists onboard the Pisces; this includes the science party’s chief scientist and fishery research biologist, Kevin Rademacher, fishery research biologist Paul Felts, and fishery research biologist John Moser.  Other members of the science party include fishery biologist Adam Pollack and guest scientist Harriet Nash.  In order to be a fishery biologist, one needs a degree that includes courses such as limnology, ichthyology, fishery biology, and various other aquatic topics.  A background including technology, computer programming, and statistics is also useful when data analysis software is needed to produce maps and other displays of research data.  Having research experience that gives one the ability to do the data collection and processing, trouble-shooting, and analysis that is needed to carry out fishery research is also necessary.

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Jim Johnson works on the camera array after another full day of scheduled camera drops and data acquisition.

Do you have an interest in computers, computer programming, and electronics?  If so, NOAA needs you!  Meet Jim Johnson; Jim is an electronics technician for this mission.  His responsibilities include data downloading and maintenance and repair of the camera array system.  He started working for NOAA as a contractor and has been a NOAA employee for the last five years.  He has a four year degree in electronic engineering technology and a background in computers, technology, and computer programming.

Personal Log:  Unfortunately, my time on the Pisces is quickly coming to an end as the science carried out by the Pisces continues on for another leg of the SEAMAP survey.  I am so grateful for this experience and this remarkable program that NOAA has in place to provide such research experiences for teachers.  I look forward to developing materials in my classroom from this experience and making an impact on my students’ lives by sharing my experiences with STEM related NOAA careers.  I am also thankful to all of the crew and scientists of the Pisces for showing patience in everything from explaining basic ship operations and procedures to showing me how to carry out some of the science onboard.  The hands-on nature of the cruise made it an extremely valuable learning experience.  It is my hope that this program will continue offering such opportunities to educators well into the future.  I truly believe that the future of STEM-related jobs in the United States depends on programs like this to develop tomorrow’s scientists and engineers.

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3 Replies to “Spencer Cody: NOAA Careers, June 10, 2014”

  1. Spencer, I have enjoyed reading your blogs while aboard the Pisces. You’ve done a great job giving a sample of some of the amazing career opportunities NOAA has to offer. Thanks for a good read.

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