Sue Zupko: 6 Flying to 300 Meters

NOAA Teacher at Sea: Sue Zupko
NOAA Ship: Pisces
Mission: Study deep water coral, Lophelia Pertusa, in the Gulf Stream
Geographical Area of Cruise: SE United States in Gulf Stream from off Mayport, FL to south of St. Lucie Inlet, FL
Date: June 3, 2011
Time: 15:33 EDT

Weather Data from the Bridge
Wind Speed: 2.59 knots
Visibility: 10 n.m.
Surface Water Temperature: 28.25°C
Air Temperature:28.9°C
Relative Humidity: 61%
Barometric Pressure:1018.20mb
Water Depth: 280.94 m
Salinity: 36.33 PSU

Hello from the Pisces “flight” deck.  I am sitting next to the pilots of the ROV.  John Butler is currently flying the ROV at a depth of 243 meters.  We are drifting with the ship as it makes its way to our survey site.  The ROV has been in the water since around 9:00 this morning EDT and we have finished our lunch and are waiting to get to our drop site.  Why is the ROV flying along at 243 meters when our survey site is at 300 meters?  When the ROV first launched, the current was 3.5 knots above and below the surface.  The ship’s crew on the bridge calculated how long it would take for us to arrive at the dive site given the currents.  Once we started flying the ROV at depth, we found the counterweight acted as an anchor and the current slowed down above and below the surface.  Accordingly, the ROV slowed down and it’s taking a lot longer to get to our dive site than originally calculated.

Jelly with tentacles spread out floating in the water column.
Jellyfish found on the way to the sea floor

What are we seeing on the video feed from the ROV?  Lots of marine snow–detritus, zooplankton, and other small particles, plus a few interesting creatures– jellies,  salps, several squid,  arrow worms, and some hydrozoa.  It really is surreal watching the video of our journey to the bottom of the sea.

Two men with helmets holding the ROV over the side of the boat, helped by a winch.
Crew Members holding the ROV, helped by a winch

What are we expecting to find? Lophelia pertusaLophelia is a ture hard, or stony, coral from the phylum Cnidaria, class Anthozoa (meaning it is a polyp), class Anthozoa (starts as a larva swimming around and then becomes attached to something, or sessile).  We want to find out how many there are, their health, their size, and what is living amongst them.  Lophelia are white when they are alive, unlike shallow water corals that most people are familiar with which have colors from the algae which live with them.  If the Lophelia is not white, it’s either sick or dead.

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