Emily Cilli-Turner: Back on Land, August 13, 2018


NOAA Teacher at Sea

Emily Cilli-Turner

Aboard NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson

July 24 – August 11, 2018

 

Mission: Pollock Acoustic-Trawl Survey

Geographic Area of Cruise: Eastern Bering Sea

Date: August 13, 2018

 

Weather Data for Claremont, CA from National Weather Service:

Latitude:  34.1368º N

Longitude:  117.7076º W

Wind Speed: 12 mph

Wind Direction: SSW

Air Temperature:  29.4º Celsius

Humidity: 36%

Personal Log 

Well, NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson docked in Dutch Harbor on August 11th from the 19-day journey in the Eastern Bering Sea.  During our time at sea, I learned so much and got to know both the NOAA scientists and the crew and officers on the ship.  When I applied for the Teacher at Sea program, I knew that it would be an invaluable experience, but it far exceeded my expectations.  I learned about the work of the NOAA scientists pretty much non-stop and any question I had was answered in detail, which allowed me to have a robust picture of the work the NOAA scientists do, the different types of scientific instruments they use and the underlying principles behind them as well as the day-to-day operations of a scientific vessel such as NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson.  Additionally, I also ate the best food of my life made by the stewards; there was always amazing entrees and dessert at every meal!

NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson

NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson in Dutch Harbor, Alaska

After we came into port, I was able to explore the town of Dutch Harbor as well.  Along with other NOAA Scientists and the ship’s medic, I explored the Museum of the Aleutians in town and learned about the native people of the island and their traditions as well as the military encampments that were built on Unalaska (the island where Dutch Harbor is) during WWII.  The next day we went up Ballyhoo mountain and saw the ruins of one of the WWII bases.  The view from there was amazing and we saw all around Unalaska.  I was surprised in Dutch Harbor to see so many bald eagles everywhere!  The next day I said goodbye to the many people I got to know aboard the Oscar Dyson, many of whom were staying aboard for the next leg or for a long time thereafter.  I was surprised how easily I transitioned to life aboard the boat and it still feels a bit weird to not be moving all the time!

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s