Emily Cilli-Turner: Back on Land, August 13, 2018

NOAA Teacher at Sea

Emily Cilli-Turner

Aboard NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson

July 24 – August 11, 2018

 

Mission: Pollock Acoustic-Trawl Survey

Geographic Area of Cruise: Eastern Bering Sea

Date: August 13, 2018

 

Weather Data for Claremont, CA from National Weather Service:

Latitude:  34.1368º N

Longitude:  117.7076º W

Wind Speed: 12 mph

Wind Direction: SSW

Air Temperature:  29.4º Celsius

Humidity: 36%

Personal Log 

Well, NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson docked in Dutch Harbor on August 11th from the 19-day journey in the Eastern Bering Sea.  During our time at sea, I learned so much and got to know both the NOAA scientists and the crew and officers on the ship.  When I applied for the Teacher at Sea program, I knew that it would be an invaluable experience, but it far exceeded my expectations.  I learned about the work of the NOAA scientists pretty much non-stop and any question I had was answered in detail, which allowed me to have a robust picture of the work the NOAA scientists do, the different types of scientific instruments they use and the underlying principles behind them as well as the day-to-day operations of a scientific vessel such as NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson.  Additionally, I also ate the best food of my life made by the stewards; there was always amazing entrees and dessert at every meal!

NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson

NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson in Dutch Harbor, Alaska

After we came into port, I was able to explore the town of Dutch Harbor as well.  Along with other NOAA Scientists and the ship’s medic, I explored the Museum of the Aleutians in town and learned about the native people of the island and their traditions as well as the military encampments that were built on Unalaska (the island where Dutch Harbor is) during WWII.  The next day we went up Ballyhoo mountain and saw the ruins of one of the WWII bases.  The view from there was amazing and we saw all around Unalaska.  I was surprised in Dutch Harbor to see so many bald eagles everywhere!  The next day I said goodbye to the many people I got to know aboard the Oscar Dyson, many of whom were staying aboard for the next leg or for a long time thereafter.  I was surprised how easily I transitioned to life aboard the boat and it still feels a bit weird to not be moving all the time!

 

Emily Cilli-Turner: Journey’s Coming to an End, August 9, 2018

NOAA Teacher at Sea

Emily Cilli-Turner

Aboard NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson

July 24 – August 11, 2018

 

Mission: Pollock Acoustic-Trawl Survey

Geographic Area of Cruise: Eastern Bering Sea

Date: August 9, 2018

 

Weather Data from the Bridge:

Latitude: 60º28.02 N

Longitude: 175º25.19 W

Wind Speed: 8.77 knots

Wind Direction:  236.54º (SW)

Air Temperature:  8.8º Celsius

Barometric Pressure: 1010.7 mb

Sea Wave Height: 2-3 feet

Visibility: less than 1 nautical mile

 

Science Log

I had a chance to interview the chief scientist aboard NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson, Taina Honkalehto, and ask her about her career path to working at NOAA as well as recommendations she has for anyone interested in an ocean career.

Taina knew that she wanted to pursue a career in science ever since she was a child as she has always been interested in the outdoors and collecting and observing things.  During college, she took an oceanography course as a junior and knew she wanted to work with the ocean.  Her college advisor recommended that if she wanted to pursue science she needed to do a field program.  As a junior, she was able to secure participation at a marine lab in the U.S. Virgin Islands, which inspired her choice to go to graduate school and study invertebrate zoology.

At NOAA, Taina really enjoys her colleagues and the field work, which includes the pollock counting work she is currently doing on NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson.  She feels that her work at NOAA is an opportunity to contribute to the preservation of our planet.  Additionally, she enjoys doing outreach at NOAA and talking to people about her work and answering questions about the ocean.  Often, discussions with the public involve balancing what they have heard about fisheries and overfishing in the news versus the reality and experiences Taina has had in the field counting pollock in the Bering Sea and Gulf of Alaska.

The advice that Taina has for those wanting to work for NOAA is to get an internship.  Students can find internship opportunities through the NOAA website and there are avenues into NOAA experience for students at the middle and high school level as well as college students.  These internships are a great way to get hands-on experience (as I can attest!) and some of them are even paid if students apply for the Hollings scholarship. Taina also recommends reading some of the following books to get an idea about what it is like on a field placement: “The Log from the Sea of Cortez” by John Steinbeck, “Moby Duck” by Donovan Hohn, and “Cod” by Mark Kurlansky.

Taina Honkalehto

Chief Scientist aboard NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson, Taina Honkalehto

 

Personal Log

The wet lab aboard NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson is where most of the action happens during my shift.  When a haul comes in, we are responsible for processing the catch and obtaining the needed measurements so that the MACE team can put together their report on the health of the pollock population.  The catch is released from the trawling net onto a hydraulic table that can be dumped onto a conveyor belt.  The first job to be done is to sort the catch, where all species that are not adult pollock are separated out.

Pollock on belt

Adult pollock from a haul on the sorting belt

The next task is to measure the length of a subsample of about 300 of the adult pollock in the catch.  This helps the NOAA scientists to create histograms of pollock lengths to compare between hauls.  Finally, about 30 pollock are separated to measure length, weight and to determine gender and maturity and another 30 have length and weight measured, otoliths taken, and ovaries weighed and collected if the pollock is a spawning female.  During my shift, there are six of us in the fish lab and we are working like a well-oiled machine!

Today we are starting the long transit back to Dutch Harbor.  It is bittersweet since I feel like we have a nice routine down in the fish lab and I finally feel used to the motions of the ship.  However, I am grateful for this opportunity and for all the great people that I have gotten to know during my time on NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson.  Also, we finally saw some blue sky again and a rainbow even came out for a moment!

rainbow

A small rainbow over the Bering Sea

 

Did You Know?

The NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson was launched on October 17, 2003. It is named after Alaskan fisherman Oscar Dyson and there is a smaller boat on board named after his wife, Peggy Dyson.

Mark Van Arsdale, How Big is Alaska Anyway? August 13, 2018

NOAA Teacher at Sea

Mark Van Arsdale

Aboard NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson

September 3–14, 2018

Mission: Bering Sea Juvenile Groundfish Survey

Geographic Area of Cruise: Dutch Harbor, Alaska

Date: August 13, 2018

Latitude: 61.3293° N
Longitude: 149.5680° W
Air Temperature: 56° F
Sky: Rain (typical weather for August in AK)

Cascade Glacier

Me standing in front of the rapidly melting Cascade Glacier, Harriman Fjord, Prince William Sound.

Personal Introduction

My name is Mark Van Arsdale.  I am a high school teacher in Eagle River, Alaska.  Eagle River is a bedroom community just outside of Anchorage.  At ERHS, I teach AP Biology, Forensic Science, Oceanography, and Marine Biology.  I will be aboard the NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson as a participant in the 2018 NOAA Teacher at Sea program.

It’s raining right now, and I am sitting in my kitchen contemplating the start of the new school year next week and the start of a new adventure next month.   In three weeks I will fly from Anchorage to Dutch Harbor, Alaska to join the scientists and crew of the NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson.  Even though I will never leave the state, I will fly 796 miles, the same distance as flying from New York to Chicago.  Alaska is an incredibly large state, almost 600,000 square miles of land and 34,000 miles of coastline.  My adventure will take me into the Bering Sea.  Although I have never been there, I have a connection to the Bering Sea.  Like many other Alaskans’, much of the salmon and other seafood my family eats spends all or part of its lifecycle traveling through the rich waters of the Bering Sea.

Alaska map

At 591,000 square miles, Alaska is as wide as the lower 48 states and larger than Texas, California, and Montana combined. Copyright Alaska Sea Adventures.

Alaska and Alaskans are highly dependent on the oceans. Commercial fishing in the Gulf of Alaska and Bering Sea produces more groundfish (pollock, cod, rockfish, sablefish, and flatfish) than any other place in the country, close to 2 million metric tons per year. In 2013 that was valued at over $2 billion.  Fishing is consistently Alaska’s top non-government employer and after oil, seafood represents our largest export.  Thousands of residents participate every year in subsistence fishing, and hundreds of thousands of tourists visit Alaska each year, many with the hopes of catching a wild salmon or halibut (facts from the Alaska Sea Grant).

My classroom is less than five miles from the ocean (Cook Inlet Estuary), yet many of the students I teach have never seen the ocean.  They may not know the importance of the ocean to our state.  When I teach Oceanography and Marine Biology, I work very hard to connect my students to both the science and industry of the oceans.  Not just so that my students can understand what kind of work that scientist and fishermen do, but also so that they will understand the value of the work do.

I have been in the classroom for twenty years, and in the last few years I have seen more and more students entering my classroom who see no value in science.  Science matters!  The oceans and our relationship to the oceans matter!  I am hopeful that working on board the Oscar Dyson with a team of scientists is going to help me make those connections better.

Have I mentioned yet that I love fish?  I love to study fish, teach about fish, catch fish, cook fish, eat fish, watch fish.  So I am pretty excited about spending two weeks on a research cruise dedicated to fish research, and working with some of the Scientists from the Alaska Fisheries Science Center.

IMG_8559

A Quillback rockfish caught in Prince William Sound.

 

Emily Cilli-Turner: Plenty of Fish in the (Bering) Sea, August 6, 2018

 

NOAA Teacher at Sea

Emily Cilli-Turner

Aboard NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson

July 24 – August 11, 2018

 

Mission: Pollock Acoustic-Trawl Survey

Geographic Area of Cruise: Eastern Bering Sea

Date: August 6, 2018

 

Weather Data from the Bridge:

Latitude: 58 04.81 N

Longitude: 174 06.88 W

Wind Speed: 6.88 knots

Wind Direction: 275.19 (NW)

Air Temperature: 10.0 C

Barometric Pressure: 1013.2 mb

Visibility: 6 nautical miles

Sea Wave Height: 4 feet

Sky: Overcast

 

Science Log

While the techniques written about in the previous blog post ensure that when we use the trawling nets we mostly catch pollock, there is usually a small amount of by-catch in each haul.  By-catch means ocean life other than pollock (the desired catch) that we bring up in a haul using the trawling net.  This post will focus on some of the creatures that I have seen in the catches during my time on NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson.

 

Principal species of interest:

Pollock: The scientific name for these pollock (known as Alaska pollock or walleye pollock) is Gadus chalcogrammus.  We often catch many different ages of pollock, from age 0 pollock up to large adult pollock and these range in length from a few centimeters up to about 62 centimeters. Pollock is most of what we catch, and they are easy to identify by their three dorsal fins and speckling.  Pollock mainly eat euphausiids and copepods, but also sometimes eat the age 0 pollock.

Adult pollock

Adult pollock

 

By-catch species:

Chum Salmon: Chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) is one of the five types of salmon and lives for about 6 years on average.  Like all salmon, they are spawned in freshwater and then migrate out to the ocean.  Once they return to the freshwater and spawn, they die about two weeks later. They mostly eat zooplankton and insects, but have been known to eat comb jellyfish as well.

chum salmon

Student intern Liz Allyn with a chum salmon from a haul.

 

Jellyfish: We see several types of jellyfish in each catch, but we mainly see the Northern Sea Nettle (Chrysaora melanaster).  We have also seen Northern Sea Nettle swimming near the surface before sunrise when we are pole fishing for pollock.  The word melanaster translates to “black star,” which you can identify in the pattern on the bell of this jellyfish. The bell diameter can reach up to 12 inches and the tentacles can grow as long as 10 feet. As climate change has warmed the surface temperatures of the Bering Sea, the population of Northern Sea Nettle is increasing.  Northern Sea Nettles mostly eat zooplankton, but sometimes also eat pollock!

Chrysaora melanster

Chrysaora melanster

Smooth Lumpsucker: Smooth lumpsuckers (Cyclopterus lumpus) are named so because of an adhesive disc on their underside that helps them suction onto the ocean floor.  These fish spend most of their time on the bottom of the ocean and are not particularly good swimmers. The roe (eggs) of the lumpsucker is a delicacy in Scandinavia.

Flatfish: Alaska Plaice & Yellowfin Sole: We have also caught two types of flatfish during my time aboard the ship: yellowfin sole (Pleuronectes aspera) and Alaska Plaice (Pleuronectes quadrituberculatus). These peculiar looking fish can be identified by having both eyes on top of their head.  When they are spawned, these fish have eyes on either side of their head, but as they get older the eyes migrate to be on the same side. These fish mainly reside on the ocean floor, where they eat polychaetes and amphipods, such as worms and mollusks.

Capelin: The capelin (Mallotus villosus) is a small fish in the smelt family reaching a length of about 10 inches.  It feeds mainly on plankton and krill.  The most interesting thing about capelin is their smell; if you put their scales close to your nose you will smell cucumbers!

Capelin

Capelin

 

Personal Log

While the weather since boarding the NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson has largely consisted of some high winds and big swells, there have been one or two nice days in the Bering Sea. On these days, we have taken the opportunity to go outside.  On one particularly nice day where the sun was shining, there was a mini corn-hole tournament on the deck.  After thinking that my time on the ship was the least amount of time spent outside during the summer, this was a nice way to spend the after-dinner time.

corn hole

Operations officer LT Carl Noblitt and student intern Grace Workman playing corn-hole on the deck.

I am also grateful for NOAA scientists Mike Levine and Darin Jones, who have made me feel like an expert in the fish lab.  At this point, I know more about pollock than I ever thought I would.  In the fish lab, I primarily am responsible for measuring the length of the pollock sample.  However, Mike and Darin have also taught me about pollock anatomy and how to tell if a pollock is male or female.  I have also become good at extracting the otoliths, which involves a precise cut of the pollock.  For a person with almost no experience working with biological specimens, much less fish, I finally feel like a useful part of the team.

Did You Know?

The Bering Sea is an extremely important fishing location and the United States catches over $1 billion of seafood here each year.

Emily Cilli-Turner: Catching Pollock with Mathematics! August 1, 2018

NOAA Teacher at Sea

Emily Cilli-Turner

Aboard NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson

July 24 – August 11, 2018

 

Mission: Pollock Acoustic-Trawl Survey

Geographic Area of Cruise: Eastern Bering Sea

Date: August 1, 2018

 

Weather Data from the Bridge:

Latitude: 61 55.41 N

Longitude: 172 48.34 W

Wind Speed: 2.24 knots

Wind Direction: 77.54 (NW)

Air Temperature: 9.7 C

Barometric Pressure: 998.8 mb

Visibility: 9 nautical miles

Sea Wave Height: 3 feet

Sky: Overcast

 

Science Log:

“When am I ever going to use this?”  This is the query of many students who are required to take mathematics courses.  However, scientists aboard the NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson use mathematics every day as part of their job.  As discussed in a previous blog post, underwater acoustic data are collected as the NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson navigates along the transects.  These backscatter data are relied upon to decide when to take trawling net samples as well as to estimate the number and biomass of pollock in the area.

How do these underwater acoustics work?  The answer can be found in mathematics and physics.  As previously discussed, echosounders affixed to a centerboard below the hull of the ship send an audible ping down into the water and measure how long it takes to bounce off of an object (like a pollock) and return to the surface. The echosounders know the transmitted signal power (denoted Pt) and measure the received signal power (denoted Pr).  Measuring the time between the signal transmission and reception and multiplying by the speed of sound (approximately 1450 m/s, given local water salinity and temperature conditions) will allow the calculation of distance of an object below the surface (or range denoted r). Using acoustics properties combined with known properties of pollock, we can get the equation for backscattering strength at a point as eqn1.png, where β is a constant and C(r) is a constant that is dependent on range.

However, since sound is measured in decibels which are arranged on a log scale, 10 times the log of both sides of the backscattering strength equation is desired.  Using logarithm rules, this becomes

eqn2

The value on the left-hand side of this equation is commonly referred to as target strength (TS) and is an important value to complete the survey.

The target strength is the amount of energy returned from a fish of a certain length.  Since the echosounders are transmitting through the water column below the ship, the TS values are converted to backscatter strength per volume unit of water, referred to in the literature as Sv.  The Sv values are graphed on the EK60 scientific echosounder, giving a picture similar to the one below.  Different colors in the output are matched to various ranges of Sv values.  An experienced fisheries scientist, like the ones aboard the NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson, can use the echosign data to determine a possible picture of the ocean life below the ship.  While the EK60 scientific echosounder can transmit at five different frequencies (18 kHz, 38 kHz, 70 kHz, 120 kHz, and 200 kHz), the 38-kilohertz transmission frequency is the best frequency to detect pollock.  Other transmission frequencies are shown to help delineate adult pollock from baby pollock and from other types of fish and smaller crustaceans called euphausiids.

EK60

Screenshot of an EK60 reading of the water column below the ship with identifying features notated.

The target strength is related to the length of the fish.  The age of pollock is strongly correlated to their length until they are about 4 years old, so length can help the scientists determine how many of each year class are in the ocean below.  Once again, logarithms come in handy, as the equation that relates the fork length in centimeters, l, of the pollock to the recorded target strength is TS = 20 log l – 66. This allows the scientists to use the echosounder data to get an approximate measure of the fish below without having to catch them.

Personal Log:

Today we will be going on a partial tour of NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson so you can see where I spend most of my time while aboard.  The first stop is my stateroom, where I sleep and relax when not on shift.  The top bunk is mine and the bottom bunk belongs to my roommate, NOAA scientist Abigail McCarthy.  Our stateroom has one window where we can check on the weather and sea conditions.  The picture below shows our view most of the time: cloudy!

 

Next stop is the mess hall where three meals a day are served.  The stewards do a great job of cooking creative meals for everyone aboard.  Before I boarded the ship, I bought a lot of snacks because I was worried about not getting enough to eat, but boy was I wrong.  There is always plenty to eat at every meal, snacks that are out if you get hungry in between, and lots of dessert!

mess

The mess hall.

Finally, we come to the fish lab where the trawling net samples referred to in my last blog post are processed.  Before processing, we go to the ready room and put on our gear.  This includes work boots as well as waterproof coveralls and jacket.  Measuring the length of the pollock can get messy so we have to have the right gear.  Once in the fish lab, we grab our gloves and get to measuring!

 

Did You Know?

Scientists aboard the NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson are part of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), which is one of the six major line offices of NOAA.

Emily Cilli-Turner: Out to Sea! July 26, 2018

NOAA Teacher at Sea

Emily Cilli-Turner

Aboard NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson

July 24 – August 11, 2018

 

Mission: Pollock Acoustic-Trawl Survey

Geographic Area of Cruise: Eastern Bearing Sea

Date: July 26, 2018

 

Weather Data from the Bridge:

Latitude: 56º 11.29 N

Longitude: 171º 12.29 W

Wind Speed: 14.33 knots

Wind Direction: 329.81º

Air Temperature:  9.1º Celsius

Barometric Pressure: 1016.2 mb

 

Science Log:

Scientists aboard NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson are aiming to estimate the number and biomass of pollock in the Eastern Bering Sea, which, as you can imagine, is a big undertaking.  In order to complete this job, they use a lot of sophisticated technology to determine where the fish are as well as statistical methods to extrapolate the total number of fish from the samples taken. This job is extremely important as it helps to determine the health and sustainability of the pollock population in the Bering Sea so that the government can model and forecast next year’s population numbers, and the North Pacific Fishery Management Council can set future catch quotas.

The first piece of technology used is the underwater acoustics. Echosounders send an audible ping down into the water and measure how long it takes to bounce off of an object (like a pollock) and return to the surface.  Using the known value of the speed of sound, this technology can create a picture of where the fish are below the boat.  While the acoustics only show that there is an object the length of a fish below, the scientists use their knowledge of the regions pollock normally occupy, the depth they regularly swim at, as well as the shape and size of pollock aggregations to determine when they are seeing pollock versus other types of fish.

EK60 for TAS

The picture of the fish below the water created by the underwater acoustics.

Once it is determined that there is likely a large school of pollock in the area, then the trawling nets are deployed to catch pollock.  Once the nets are hauled in, the total catch is weighed and then a smaller sample is pulled to collect length and weight data to determine the sizes of fish in the area.  Other samples, such as the pollock ear bone (otolith) or ovaries may also be taken at this time. Using statistics, the number and length of pollock in the entire catch and then in the entire area is estimated.

Trawling nets on the ship.

Trawling nets on the ship.

Personal Log:

The flight into Dutch Harbor was very exciting.  Before boarding the plane, they weigh you and your carry-on baggage to make sure the plane will be balanced and that there is not too much weight.  The airport at Dutch Harbor is not much more than a landing strip between two mountains.  We came in for landing right over the water and for a second it looked like we might land on the water before the landing strip appeared. Once we reached the dock where we boarded the NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson, I saw a sea otter, but it disappeared before I could take a picture of it!

welcome

The sign at the Dutch Harbor airport. Notice the latitude and longitude; this is the farthest north I have ever been!

So far, I am adjusting to life at sea.   The first day the boat was a little rough and I got a bit seasick, however after seeing the ship’s medic for some medication I am feeling much better.  During our first full day at sea we had to practice safety drills, which are required within 24 hours of departing.  Once they announce the drill, you have to grab your life jacket and survival suit from your stateroom and bring them to the assembly point on the deck.  Then, we had to practice putting on the survival suit, which is sort of like a giant wet suit complete with a hood, lights and a manually-inflated flotation device.

plane

The plane I flew on from Anchorage to Dutch Harbor.

The ship itself is like a small city; there are the residences, which are the staterooms where we sleep, the entertainment, which is the lounge where there is always a moving playing, and the restaurant, which is the mess hall where great food is served three times a day.  However, this “city” runs and powers itself; all electricity and water must be made aboard the boat.

The hardest adjustment so far has been a temporal one.  I am responsible for the 4am – 4pm shift in the fish lab, which means I must rise by 3:30am every day! I am normally not an early riser so this has been tough, but the rocking of the ship means that when I do go to bed I normally get a great night’s sleep!

Did You Know?

Scientists collect the ear bone, called the otolith, from pollock to determine their age.  This bone grows in rings for each year, just like a tree!

 

Lee Teevan: The Unexpected Happens, July 13, 2018

NOAA Teacher at Sea

Lee Teevan

Aboard NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson

July 1-10, 2018

Mission: Acoustic Pollock-Trawl

Geographic Area of Cruise: eastern Bering Sea

Date: 13 July 2018

View of the Oscar Dyson on our last morning in Dutch Harbor, AK

View of the Oscar Dyson on our last morning in Dutch Harbor, AK

 

Weather Data from Norfolk, VA

Latitude: 36.8508° N

Longitude: 76.2859° W

Tide Heights: 2.76 ft & 3.35 ft

Wind Speed: 19 km/h

Wind Direction: NE

Air Temperature: 28°C, 82°F

Barometric Pressure: 1028.1 mb

Sky: Clear

Humidity: 76%

“If you’re awake at 6:00 a.m., you’ll get to see the Oculus as I prepare it to glide around in the Bering Sea!”  With this promise from Dr. Chris Bassett, I made sure I was ready at the appointed time on our last day on the ship.

Dr. Chris Bassett preparing the Oculus.

Dr. Chris Bassett preparing the Oculus.

The launching of the Oculus was not on Chris’ schedule for that day beforehand; our expedition was ending earlier than expected.  That setback, however, did not diminish the drive to pursue science.  The resilience and perseverance of the science team to readjust was apparent.  Through the mist of  disappointment, the scientists continued to do as much as possible to continue our mission of the pollock survey.

 

Science and Technology Log

Developed at Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory in partnership with the University of Washington’s Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean and the University of Washington Seaglider Fabrication Lab, the Oculus is an ocean glider which samples abiotic factors in the ocean such as temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen at different depths.

Inner component of the Oculus which regulates buoyancy.

Inner component of the Oculus which regulates buoyancy.

After setting the Oculus upright, Chris connected it via the Internet to a computer operated by a scientist at the University of Washington.  This scientist is going to be sending coordinates to the Oculus and guiding it at various depths in the Bering Sea.  Chris explained that the Oculus has the ability to adjust its buoyancy quickly and is able to carry out a more reliable survey than other gliders.  Through the data remotely sent by the Oculus, scientists can gather a more accurate picture of ocean dynamics such as water column layers and ocean mixing.

Unfortunately, I was not able to observe the launch of the Oculus as I had to leave for the airport.

Personal Log

View from dock in Dutch Harbor, AK.

View from dock in Dutch Harbor, AK.

The week I spent on the ship was a whirlwind of experiences. I was just hitting my stride being completely awake for my 4:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. work shift and efficiently measuring the length of the pollock in each trawl.

Pollock and jellyfish in trawl.

Pollock and jellyfish in trawl.

At the end of the last trawl, I held a pollock, out of its element of water. Its dense, streamlined body shimmered with iridescence.  One eye stared, unfocused on the strange surroundings.   I too would be out of my element were it not for the 208.6 ft. boat on which I was standing.  Being on the boat was a constant reminder that my species is alien to this ocean habitat and that to explore it, we have to use technology such as the Oculus, underwater cameras, and acoustic technology as well as physical trawls.  Together, these different means of exploring combine information so that we can evaluate our interactions with the ocean and its inhabitants.

The view of the horizon from the deck of the Oscar Dyson.

The view of the horizon from the deck of the Oscar Dyson.

At times, the ocean had a disorienting effect.  When on the deck, I looked out from all directions and saw nothing but ocean capped by a dome of stratus clouds.  Under this lid of heavy clouds, the sun gave no clue to discern our direction or time of day.

Marine Careers

Karla Martinez, Junior Unlicensed Engineer, on duty on the Oscar Dyson.

Karla Martinez, Junior Unlicensed Engineer, on duty on the Oscar Dyson.

With her philosophy of focusing on the positive, Karla Martinez enjoys her time on and off duty on the Oscar Dyson.  As a Junior Engineer, Karla is responsible for ship upkeep and repairs.  On our last day of the trip, I spoke to her as she changed air filters in all of the staterooms.  Karla began working as a NOAA Junior Engineer three years ago after seven years in the U.S. Navy.  Since working for NOAA, she has traveled extensively and makes sure she visits each place the Oscar Dyson docks.  Karla is on the ship for at least 7-8 months of the year, and she makes the ship feel like home by getting to know people.

Karla Martinez, Tourist, off duty in field of flowers, Unalaska, AK.

Karla Martinez, Tourist, off duty in field of flowers, Unalaska, AK.

For young people who are interested in a career like Karla’s, she advises asking many questions and studying technology as much as possible. In high school, students should take the ASVAP test before entering the military.  Once admitted to the military, students should get trained. Karla states that students should talk to their counselors and find out all they can.