Jeff Lawrence, May 25, 2006


NOAA Teacher at Sea
Jeff Lawrence
Onboard NOAA Ship Rainier
May 22 – June 2, 2006

Mission: Hydrography survey
Geographical area of cruise: Alaska
Date: May 25, 2006

Photo of ENS Nathan Eldridge logging weather data from the  RAINIER to be sent into NOAA for weather analysis of the area.

ENS Nathan Eldridge logging weather data to be sent to NOAA for analysis of the area.

Weather Data from Bridge as of 0730 Hours 
Visibility: 10.0 miles/16.1 Km
Wind direction: calm/no wind
Wind Speed:  calm
Sea level pressure: 1015 mb or 29.97 inches
Present weather: scattered cirrocumulus clouds, lots of sun
Temperature:  48 deg. wet/50 deg. dry

Science and Technology Log 

After completing breakfast I spent the rest of the morning on board the RAINIER and visited with the crew on some of their duties on the ship.  At 1000 hours I had a briefing on the bridge with Nathan Eldridge on how the RAINIER collects weather data every six hours that it then sends to NOAA so that, the data can be used by meteorologists for weather observations and predictions. Nathan has been aboard the RAINIER since Nov. of 2005, so this is his first full season at sea.  Nathan is an ensign signified by the acronym ENS.  He attended the NOAA Corp’s program for officer training before coming aboard the RAINIER.

ENS Sam Greenaway explains navigational charts.  Navigation is crucial to the ships success through the  Alaskan waterways.

ENS Sam Greenaway explains navigational charts. Navigation is crucial to the ships through the Alaskan waterways.

ENS Sam Greenaway has been aboard the RAINIER since Nov. of 2004.  Sam is the ships navigation officer and plots paths through the Alaskan waterways.  There are many things to read on a navigational chart, a good understanding of the charts allows Sam to plot a safe and direct path to the location at which the RAINIER will anchor next.  The ship will be leaving Wrangell Narrows for the Biorka Islands in the next day or so.

Personal Log 

Last evening I was invited by the XO, Julia Neander and AB Leslie Abramson to go kayaking in the Wrangell Narrows just before dusk.  The water was calm and the sun was slowly disappearing behind the snow-capped mountains.  The trip was very tranquil and serene. I enjoyed the experience immensely.  The crew aboard the RAINIER are very helpful and assist me in any way they can to make my stay as enjoyable and productive as possible. 

Questions of the Day 

What is the Beaufort scale and how is it used? What is the difference between a nautical mile and a statute mile? What is the difference in speed between miles per hour and knots per hour? What is the length of a fathom?

Kayaking excursion enjoyed after hours by some of RAINIER’S crew.  In photo are the XO, Julia Neander and AB Leslie Abramson.  Photo was taken by TAS Jeff Lawrence on the evening of May 24th in the Wrangell Narrows off the Alaskan coastline.

Kayaking excursion enjoyed after hours by some of RAINIER’S crew. In photo are the XO, Julia Neander and AB Leslie Abramson. Photo was taken by TAS Jeff Lawrence in the Wrangell Narrows

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