Ashley Cosme: Haulback – September 7th, 2018


NOAA Teacher at Sea

Ashley Cosme

Aboard NOAA Ship Oregon II

August 31 – September 14, 2018

 

Mission: Shark/Red Snapper Longline Survey

Geographic Area of Cruise: Gulf of Mexico

Date: September 7th, 2018

Current Path.jpg

Primary longline stations are indicated in purple. The red line represents the path the Oregon II.

Weather Data from the Bridge:

  • Latitude: 28 30.4N
  • Longitude: 95 07.0W
  • Wind speed:  9 Knots
  • Wind direction:  130 (from Southeast)
  • Sky cover: Scattered
  • Visibility:  10 miles
  • Barometric pressure:  1016.0 atm
  • Sea wave height: 1-2 feet
  • Sea Water Temp:  30.4°C
  • Dry Bulb: 27.8°C
  • Wet Bulb: 25.7°C

 

Science and Technology Log:

Each piece of equipment is pulled back aboard the boat in the same order that it was deployed into the water.  The numbered gangions are pulled up one by one and if there is a shark attached to the hook it is brought aboard for data collection.  Larger sharks are brought up to the side of the vessel using a cradle.

Tiger Shark.jpg

Tiger Shark (Galeocerdo cuvier) on the cradle

 

Hammerhead on Cradle

Scalloped Hammerhead (Sphyrna lewini) on the cradle

 

Data that is collected for the sharks caught include the following:

#1 Length:

  • Precaudal Length: The length of the shark from the nose to the beginning of the caudal fin.
  • Fork Length: The length of the shark from the nose to the fork of the caudal fin.
  • Natural Length: The length of the shark from the nose to the end of the caudal fin as it naturally lies.
  • Total Length: The length of the shark from the nose to the end of the caudal fin when stretched to its greatest length.

    IMG_4339.jpg

    Measurements taken for an Atlantic Sharpnose Shark (Rhizoprionodon terraenovae)

 

Shark Weight.jpg

Great Hammerhead Shark (Sphyrna mokarran) being weighed

 

 

 

#2 Weight: The weight of the shark is measured in kilograms.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

M Tag.jpg

M-tag being inserted on a Great Hammerhead Shark (Sphyrna mokarran)

 

 

 

#3 M-Tag Number:  An M-tag is inserted at the base of the dorsal fin, and it contains a specific number to identify the shark.

 

 

 

 

 

Roto Tag.jpg

Roto tag being attached to a Gulf Smooth-hound Shark (Mustelus sinusmexicanus)

 

 

 

#4 Roto Tag Number: Roto tags are used on smaller shark individuals, and are clipped to the center of the dorsal fin.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once all measurements are taken, and the shark has been tagged, it is released back into the water.

Ashley holding shark

Gulf Smooth-hound Shark (Mustelus sinusmexicanus) ready for release.

 

Personal Log:

I couldn’t have been placed on a better Teacher at Sea assignment.  The entire NOAA team has been patient with me and willing to go out of their way to make sure I am enjoying my experience.  It is evident that the NOAA scientists are passionate about their work, as they are so eager to share every interesting detail no matter how small.

Thumbs Up

Having the time of my life!

 

Animals Seen:

Bull Shark (Carcharhinus leucas)

Tiger Shark (Galeocerdo cuvier)

Scalloped Hammerhead (Sphyrna lewini)

Gulf Smooth-hound Shark (Mustelus sinusmexicanus)

Great Hammerhead (Sphyrna mokarran)

Atlantic Sharpnose Shark (Rhizoprionodon terraenovae)

Blacknose Shark (Carcharhinus acronotus)

Blacktip Shark (Carcharhinus limbatus)

Golden Tilefish (Lopholatilus chamaeleonticeps)

Red Snapper (Lutjanus campechanus)

Pantropical Spotted Dolphin (Stenella attenuate)

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