Crystal Davis, Introduction, June 1, 2014

NOAA Teacher at Sea

Crystal Davis

(Almost) Aboard NOAA Ship Oregon II

June 23 – July 6, 2014

 

Mission: SEAMAP Summer Groundfish Survey 
Geographical Area of Cruise: Gulf of Mexico
Date: June 1, 2014

Personal Log

Hello from gorgeous and sunny Southern California. My name is Crystal Davis and I am finishing my tenth year of teaching and my fifth year at Hawthorne Math and Science Academy. I currently teach Advanced Placement Environmental Science, Anatomy and Physiology and Biology.

Backpacking in the Sierras

Backpacking in the Sierras

As an environmental science teacher it is important that I make connections between the classroom and current events that are occurring on our planet. For this reason I chose to apply to become a NOAA Teacher at Sea. My students spend a significant portion of their year studying the ocean and atmosphere and the various ways humans impact these systems. I want to bring current research into my classroom and encourage my students to develop an interest in pursuing careers in research as they deepen their understanding of their actions on our planet.

I am excited to begin my cruise in three weeks when I set sail on June 22nd on NOAA Ship Oregon II. We will be conducting bottom trawls to survey the abundance and distribution of shrimp in the Gulf of Mexico.  This method of sampling is something I teach in class and I am so happy to take part in the action and get an up front view of what it entails.

Being onboard a ship will be a significant difference from a normal day of rock climbing and backpacking with my friends in WTC and hiking with my two chihuahuas (Comet and Dasher).

Dasher and Comet hiking Mount Wilson

Dasher and Comet hiking Mount Wilson

Heather Haberman: Introduction July 1, 2011

NOAA Teacher at Sea
Heather Haberman

Onboard NOAA Ship Oregon II
July 5 — 17, 2011 


Mission: Groundfish Survey
Geographical Location: Northern Gulf of Mexico
Date: Friday, July 1, 2011

Heather Haberman

Heather Haberman, Science Teacher at Scottsbluff High School in Nebraska

Pre-cruise Personal Log: 

Allow me to introduce myself.

My name is Heather Haberman and I have been a science teacher at Scottsbluff High School in Western Nebraska for the past six years.  I LOVE being a teacher and sharing my passion for science with others.  Everyday brings a new adventure and there is rarely a dull moment.

Zoology and Environmental Science have always been my primary interests which motivated me to obtain a degree in Biology.  This degree allowed me to pursue positions such as a Research Assistant with the US Fish and Wildlife Service, an Animal Caretaker with the US Department of Agriculture, a Forest Protection Officer with the US Forest Service, as well as a Zookeeper and Education Curator for Riverside Zoo.  As an Education Curator, I realized how much fun it was to teach science so I decided to go back to college and earn my Education degree.  These real world experiences have helped me make science more fun and applicable to the lives of my students.  This is one of the reasons why I am so excited about being selected to participate in the NOAA Teacher at Sea program.

Oregon II

NOAA's research vessel the Oregon II

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is a federal agency focused on the condition of the oceans and the atmosphere.  Next week I will begin working alongside NOAA scientists on a groundfish survey in the Gulf of Mexico aboard the Oregon II.  Their primary summer objective is to determine the abundance and distribution of shrimp by depth. Other objectives include obtaining samples of commercially important fishes, such as red snapper, and crustaceans.  This data enables scientists to predict population trends which allows government officials to regulate the fishing industry in a more sustainable fashion.  It is also important to collect weather (meteorological) data and physical ocean (hydrographic) data to look for climatic trends and to assess the health of the ocean.  Plankton samples will also be collected since they play a key role in the oceanic food web and are good indicators of ecosystem change.

The Mississippi watershed drains approximately 40% of the Unites States, including Nebraska.

I am excited to be a part of this scientific research team collecting data about the health of our fisheries and oceans.  I hope that bringing back real scientific stories about research at sea will help my students from the Great Plains feel more of a connection to their watershed and the oceans of our planet.  Being over a thousand miles away from an ocean makes it easy to dismiss the fact we rely on the sea for so many of our resources, and how our actions impact the marine environment.

I will be posting updates on this blog three to four times a week.  I would like to answer as many of your questions as possible while on my mission. What would you like this sea-faring teacher to inform you about? Would you like to know about the ship; the jobs of my co-workers; marine life; ocean chemistry; my duties aboard the ship; science at sea; etc?  Leave me a message by scrolling to the bottom of the blog post and select “Leave a Comment”.  I can’t wait to hear from you.