Mike Laird, August 11, 2005

NOAA Teacher at Sea
Mike Laird
Onboard NOAA Ship Rainier
July 24 – August 13, 2005

Mission: Hydrographic Survey
Geographical Area: North Pacific
Date: August 11, 2005

Weather Data

Time: 13:00
Latitude: 55° 53.4 ̍ N
Longitude: 158˚ 50.4 ̍ W
Visibility: 10 nautical miles (nm)
Wind Direction: 225˚
Wind Speed: 10kts
Sea Wave Height: 0-1΄
Swell Wave Height: 0-1΄
Sea Water Temperature: 11.7˚ C
Sea Level Pressure: 1009.5 mb
Cloud Cover: Sky 8/8 covered; Lower level: cumulus Mid-level: altostratus High level: cirrus

Science and Technology Log 

The survey operations being conducted in the waters around Mitrofania have been closed as we begin our transit that leads to the end of an educational and entertaining 22-day voyage onboard the RAINIER. The RAINIER’s reputation as one of the most productive hydrographic survey platforms in the world can be attributed, in large part, to her officers and crew. The people who serve onboard the RAINIER come with different backgrounds, levels of education, and amounts of experience at sea.  They come for different reasons, plan to stay for different periods of time, and have different expectations of where their service on the RAINIER will lead them.  However, each of them takes pride in doing their job well. Not only does the survey and support work require everyone’s contribution but also the safety of the people and ship demands constant teamwork and cooperation.

During the time I spent on the RAINIER, everyone I interacted with was friendly and attempted to involve us in the day-to-day operations of the ship as much as possible.  I felt like a member of the team, not an outsider, and was encouraged to participate in all aspects of ship life.  All ship personnel made themselves available and patiently answered the multitudes of questions sent their way.  As a result, I have learned a lot (admittedly there is a great deal more to learn) during these three weeks about the science and technology behind hydrographic research and the importance of strong support from the following areas: the officer corps, deck, engineering, electronics, the steward’s department, and ship’s yeoman.  Without their support, the survey crew’s work would not happen.

So as we draw closer to Homer, AK and the end of my journey with the RAINIER, I would like to thank the officers and crew of the RAINIER for inviting me along for the ride!

Now – some miscellaneous stuff that didn’t fit anywhere else in my logs:

  • Fuel capacity of the RAINIER: 112,000 gallons
  • Recreational activities available during off duty hours:
  • Fishing: salmon (king, coho, pink); yelloweye rockfish; black rockfish;  lingcod
  • Sea kayaking
  • Shore exploration if a skiff is available
  • Movies – available most hours
  • Exercise area: free weights, weight machine, rowing machine,
  • stationary bike, and treadmills (2)
  • Computer games in the crew library
  • Cribbage
  • Whale watching
  • Electronic newspaper (New York Times Digest) complete with crossword
  • College degrees held by officers and crew (list is not all inclusive):   Marine science Electronic engineering and technology Biology Geographic biology Electrical engineering Environmental studies Anthropology Physics Zoology Oceanographic engineering Shoreline engineering

Personal Log 

We are scheduled to arrive in Homer around 8:00a.m. tomorrow.  The first liberty vehicles will be available in the afternoon, and I’m planning to head into town to do a little gift shopping. I was not home for my wife’s birthday (although I did send a card, and called to wish her happy birthday from Kodiak during our refueling stop), and I have to find something really good.  Planning to go to Alaska Wild Berry Products shop (I received a helpful hint before leaving home that there is one located “right in Homer”).  I also plan to check out the Pratt Museum, a place called the Blackberry Bog – sounded like an interesting shop, and of course the Salty Dog (the local watering hole).  I only have two more nights on the ship. Have to pack up, clean the room, and vacate the premises before the arrival of the next teacher at sea Saturday afternoon. I’ll spend Saturday night at the Bidarka Inn in Homer before flying out Sunday night.  It’s been great – couldn’t ask for a better experience!

Mike Laird, August 8, 2005

NOAA Teacher at Sea
Mike Laird
Onboard NOAA Ship Rainier
July 24 – August 13, 2005

Mission: Hydrographic Survey
Geographical Area: North Pacific
Date: August 8, 2005

Weather Data

Latitude: 55° 53.3 ̍ N
Longitude: 158˚ 50.5 ̍ W
Visibility: 10 nautical miles (nm)
Wind Direction: 230˚
Wind Speed: 13kts
Sea Wave Height: 0-1΄
Swell Wave Height: 0-1΄
Sea Water Temperature: 12.8˚ C
Sea Level Pressure: 1027.2 mb
Cloud Cover: Sky 0/8 covered

Science and Technology Log 

Today is probably the last day that I will be out on a launch, because tomorrow we will be running some survey lines using the ship’s sonar.  The launch I am assigned to (RA-2) is going out to collect bottom samples.  Bottom samples are primarily used to sample the ocean floor in areas that have been identified as potential anchor sites.  The information from the samples will be used to determine the locations of “good” anchor sites (sites that will provide a catch for the anchor, so it won’t just slide around).  These good anchor sites will then be included in the nautical information available for the area around Mitrofania.

A tool called a, clamshell sediment sampler, is used to retrieve the floor samples.  The clamshell is a metal tool about a foot-and-a-half long, weighing between ten and twenty pounds. It has a rounded head, really a set of spring-loaded jaws, mounted to a shaft that is seated on a circular metal plate (picture one half of a Q-tip that’s been cut in half with the cardboard shaft glued to an M&M and you’ll get an of what the sampler looks like).  The plate end of the tool is secured to a line and dropped head first over the side of the launch. When the sampler hits the seafloor, a lever activates the metal jaws (which were cocked open prior to the drop), they snap shut, and bingo a bottom sample.  On the launch, the line is threaded through an electronic pulley system and the sample is raised to the surface.  Most of the time this technique works well; however, sometimes the jaws fail to close, or they pinch shut on a rock allowing the sample to stream out on the way to the surface. In these cases, the procedure must be repeated.

Back on the launch, the sampler’s jaws are pried open and the contents are examined, and finally a record (including notations on the floor sample contents, latitude and longitude, and water depth) is created for the site. Once this is completed, the sampler is rinsed out, the boat moves to the next location, and the process is repeated.  Our team worked twenty-one sample sites and found some (not much) variety in our samples (shells only; shells and gravel; shells and silt; shells, silt and gravel; mud and gravel; and rock – determined after two casts returned with a closed, empty sampler).

Personal Log 

Today an unusual event – a bear sighting! The launch was moving to a new cast location when the coxswain, Carl, spotted three dots moving along a distant shoreline.  A closer look with the binoculars confirmed that the dots were bears (a sow and her two cubs).  The trio jogged along the shore as the cubs darted in and out of the surf frolicking and generally having a good time.  We eventually got too close and momma decided to head inland to the safety of the thick undergrowth.  Very cool!

Mike Laird, August 7, 2005

NOAA Teacher at Sea
Mike Laird
Onboard NOAA Ship Rainier
July 24 – August 13, 2005

Mission: Hydrographic Survey
Geographical Area: North Pacific
Date: August 7, 2005

Weather Data

Time: 13:00
Latitude: 55° 53.4 ̍ N
Longitude: 158˚ 50.4 ̍ W
Visibility: 10 nautical miles (nm)
Wind Direction: 225˚
Wind Speed: 10kts
Sea Wave Height: 0-1΄
Swell Wave Height: 0-1΄
Sea Water Temperature: 11.7˚ C
Sea Level Pressure: 1009.5 mb
Cloud Cover: Sky 8/8 covered; Lower level: cumulus Mid-level: altostratus High level: cirrus

Science and Technology Log 

While running echo soundings on the launch one day, the topic of conversation turned to sailing superstitions.  Since that time, I have informally talked with several crewmembers about superstitions they have heard of or that they personally believe in.  Here is what I have discovered so far.

The most widely believed superstition is that it is bad luck for a ship to leave port and set sail on a Friday. No one I talked to knew the origin of this belief, but everyone I talked to thought it best to stay in port an extra day or two and not tempt fate.  One of the ensigns had even heard a tale of a non-believer trying to prove the superstition was a bunch of bunk. He began construction of a ship on Friday, christened the ship on a Friday, put the ship under the command of a Captain Friday, and began the maiden voyage on a Friday.  The ship was never heard from again, believe it or not!  In any case, most sailors will not happily set sail from port on a Friday.

Another common superstition, observed by most, is that one should not whistle.  I heard a couple of explanations for this. One version is that whistling is not allowed on the bridge, because it will “whistle up an ill wind.”  One coxswain, who has been around the sea and ships, including steamships, for many years, gave a different rational for the whistling ban. On steamships, a whistling noise was an indicator that there was steam escaping from one of the ship’s steam pipes – often a dangerous situation.  Whatever the reason, whistling is discouraged on the ship.  As one ensign said, “I don’t whistle, because it is annoying.”

Having a woman, minister (or other religious figure on board) was at one time considered to be bad luck. None of the people I talked to felt strongly about either of those.

Apparently, having bananas onboard is supposed to be bad luck for racing vessels and fishing boats – no one knew why.

Finally, one ensign who grew up in France shared that it is not good to say the word “rabbit” onboard. Instead, one should say “long ears.”  However, having mice—stuffed, carved, etc.—will keep the real thing away.

An interesting topic!  Remember to avoid sailing from port on Friday and to refrain from whistling while you work – and life should be good!

Personal Log 

Gorgeous weather again today – scattered clouds and lots of sunshine!  This afternoon we changed anchorage locations, moving from Sosbee Bay on the southern side of the island back to Cushing Bay on the northern side. During the transit we saw a sailboat off in the distance.  Haven’t seen much traffic while we’ve been here – two fishing boats motored by, and while on the southern side we saw three tugs pulling barges out in the gulf.  Mitrofania is a pretty peaceful and secluded spot.

Mike Laird, August 4, 2005

NOAA Teacher at Sea
Mike Laird
Onboard NOAA Ship Rainier
July 24 – August 13, 2005

Mission: Hydrographic Survey
Geographical Area: North Pacific
Date: August 4, 2005

Weather Data

Latitude: 55° 50.8 ̍ N
Longitude: 158˚ 50.0 ̍ W
Visibility: 10 nautical miles (nm)
Wind Direction: Light Airs
Wind Speed: Light Airs
Sea Wave Height: 0΄
Swell Wave Height: 0΄
Sea Water Temperature: 11.7˚ C
Sea Level Pressure: 1011.0 mb
Cloud Cover: Sky 0/8 covered

Science and Technology Log 

The day begins early with launches leaving at 7:00.  The reason for the early start is that two launches (RA1 and RA2) are doing shoreline work.  Shoreline work must be done at lower low tide (in an area in which there are diurnal tides – two flooding periods and two ebbing periods – the lower low tide is the lower of the two ebbing periods), and on this day, the tidal window for this tide period is from 7:10 to 12:30.  The work along the ocean/land transition is done when the water level is at its lowest point so there is increased confidence that all features are observed and accounted for.

I have been assigned to launch RA2 and will have an opportunity for the first time to observe exactly how the shoreline surveys are conducted.  The work entails confirming existing map data from three sources: 1) the cartographic features file which is composed of data collected from aerial surveys (the photographs are used to create a map on which the shoreline and off shore features are shown); 2) LIDAR – a relatively new technology in which an aerial survey is conducted using lasers; and 3) existing nautical charts.

Confirming the data entails running the shoreline and comparing the actual shoreline and buffer (the water in a zone of between thirty and fifty meters just offshore) to what appears on the map.  A feature confirmation requires a visual observation of the feature.  As features are observed, a notation is hand written on a hard copy of the map.  Later, the notations will be input into the ship’s computer.

In addition to noting known features, features not currently shown are recorded on the map along with their location and depth.  In some cases, features shown on the map cannot be located. In these situations, a notation is made and a reason (too much kelp, water to deep, etc) is given. This signals the sheet manager that further investigation is required. If the water in the area is safe (the original boat conducting the survey is equipped with a single beam sonar system and will determine the water depth and then scan the area running in a star pattern searching for obstructions), one of the launches equipped with a multibeam echo sounding system will be sent in to do a 100% floor scan to confirm the feature.  If the area is not safe, a dive team will be sent in to do the confirmation.  Shoreline work is a bit more dynamic than the deepwater work – the crew must constantly be aware of what is happening with the surf as rocks can suddenly appear!

Personal Log 

The food onboard the RAINIER is quite tasty with a wide range of options available at every meal.  Starting off the day with breakfast (served 0700-0730), the most important meal of the day, choices include: eggs to order, fried, scrambled, poached, or boiled; omelets: cheese, minced ham, or vegetarian; french toast; hot cakes; waffles; fresh fruit: cantaloupe, pineapple, honeydew melon, mango; some type of meat: ham, bacon, sausage, Spam; cold cereal, coffee, tea, juice, milk.

Selections for today’s lunch (served from 1200-1230) were: Entrées: homemade gumbo soup, grilled fillet of catfish/tartar sauce, hot roast beef sandwich, mushroom and cheese quesadillas. Side Dishes: diced brown potatoes, steamed rice, steamed fresh cauliflower.  Dessert: chilled jello/whip cream. Drinks: water, juice, milk, lemonade or grape flavored drink, coffee.

Today’s dinner (served from 1700-1730) is a fantail (kind of like the ship’s back porch) cookout. Salads: pasta, potato, and another salad I’m note sure what it was; Entrees: BBQ – steaks, ribs and sausage, fried chicken; Side dishes: egg rolls, french fries, and pot stickers; Drinks: water and assorted juices. A real feast!

Mike Laird, August 3, 2005

NOAA Teacher at Sea
Mike Laird
Onboard NOAA Ship Rainier
July 24 – August 13, 2005

Mission: Hydrographic Survey
Geographical Area: North Pacific
Date: August 3, 2005

Weather Data

Time: 13:00
Latitude: 55° 53.4 ̍ N
Longitude: 158˚ 50.4 ̍ W
Visibility: 10 nautical miles (nm)
Wind Direction: 225˚
Wind Speed: 10kts
Sea Wave Height: 0-1΄
Swell Wave Height: 0-1΄
Sea Water Temperature: 11.7˚ C
Sea Level Pressure: 1009.5 mb
Cloud Cover: Sky 8/8 covered; Lower level: cumulus Mid-level: altostratus High level: cirrus

Deck Crew for a Day – Part II 

Previously in this log (see Day 10: Tuesday, August 2) I left you having just assisted the deck crew (of which I am a member for a day) in getting the survey launches prepped, lowered to the water, and cast off for their day of echo sounding.  All that done, and the day is just beginning.

As it turns out, the deck crew is currently running through some training exercises for some of its newer members – a perfect opportunity for me to learn a lot of new and interesting things. However before the training begins, the junior deck hands have daily cleaning responsibilities (bathrooms, trash, mopping floors, etc.) that must be taken care of. Somehow I luck out and avoid latrine duty, and Erick Davis, my mentor for the day, takes me to the bow of the ship where I am instructed on the operation of the forward cranes. These cranes are used primarily for lifting and moving the gangways (the walkways between the ship and the pier when the ship is in port) and to load stores and cargo onto the ship.

After an introduction to the crane and the hand signals used to communicate between the operator and the deck chief, I have a chance to operate the crane for a few minutes.  By this time, the rest of the group has rejoined us and the focus turns to proper mooring and anchoring techniques.

Members of the deck crew are responsible for getting the mooring lines ashore as the ship is arriving in port and retrieving and storing the lines when the ship is putting out to sea.  The RAINIER most often uses four lines (each line is assigned a number) when mooring: a bowline (line #1), an aft leading spring line (line #2), a for leading spring line (line #3), and a stern line (line #4). The sequence in which these lines are cast ashore is intended to increase the ease of docking the ship and is dependant on the docking situation.

In a routine mooring the lines will be cast in the following order: 1) aft leading spring line, 2) stern line, 3) bowline, and 4) for leading stern line.  There are aids both mechanical (capstans) and fixed on the deck (chucks and bits) that help as crew members release and take in line as the ship is being positioned alongside the pier or preparing to leave port.  These aids have taken the place of hand cranking and reduce the amount of physical effort required to manipulate mooring lines that can get quite heavy when dealing with extensive lengths (especially when wet) of line.

In addition to mooring, the deck crew is highly involved in anchoring the ship.  Once a location (chosen by the commanding officer or in some instances the officer of the deck) has been chosen to anchor, the crew prepares to drop anchor.  The flow of the anchor chain when releasing and retracting the anchor is controlled by a piece of equipment called the anchor windlass. When setting anchor, the windlass must allow chain to flow smoothly as it follows the anchor to the seafloor.

The windlass has a three-tiered system used to hold the chain in place while the ship is in transit and when anchored. First, there is a huge drum brake (much like those found on cars, but much larger); there is also a large metal latch, called the “devil’s claw” that fits through, grabs, and holds onto a chain link; finally the “cat’s paw” is a metal arm that lays on top of the chain pinching it down to prevent movement.  Each of these must be disengaged to allow release of chain. As the chain is being released, the deck chief signals to the bridge how much chain has been let out.  The chain length is measured in units called shots. Each shot is ninety feet (the RAINIER carries twelve shots of chain for each of its two anchors – 1080feet of chain per anchor) and is indicated by a section of painted chain four or five links long.

Once the anchor hits bottom, additional chain (called scope) is released to allow for fluctuations in water level caused by the tide and wave action.  The additional chain also provides additional weight to help secure the ship.  The amount of scope depends on the conditions and judgment of the officer in charge, but a general rule is to let out a total chain length of one third (distance to the bottom) plus two thirds (length of scope).  For example, if the anchor hits bottom at 27 fathoms (a fathom is six feet; 27 fathoms equals 162 feet) three hundred twenty-four more feet (or about three and one half shots) of chain would be released for scope.

Having completed the tutorial on anchoring, we turned to another aspect of the life of a deck crewmember — the operation of the small boats (launches and skiffs) on board ship.  The remainder of the afternoon is spent practicing the operation and maneuvering of a skiff. The group I am with practices basic operations: starting, stopping, smooth acceleration and deceleration, and moving in a straight line while in reverse.

Having demonstrated these skills, we go to man overboard rescue situations and practice moving the skiff into proper rescue position alongside the victim (without running them over).

Then it’s on to anchoring the skiff: choosing an acceptable location and orientation, releasing the anchor and proper amount of scope, and making sure the anchor is set to keep the skiff safely and securely positioned.

The last maneuver we practice is beach landings: choosing a location onshore that will allow personnel and equipment to move from the boat to land safely and efficiently, properly orienting the skiff for beach approach, and finally the smooth, spot-on landing.

Finally, it’s back to the RAINIER to await the return of the launches, so they can be raised by the davits back into their storage hangars.  Thus ends my day with the deck crew.

Personal Log 

While on a skiff doing shoreline work, I saw some sea lions yesterday.  Until we came along, they were peacefully napping on a rock outcrop enjoying the late morning sunshine. Our arrival caused a ruckus with a great amount of bellowing, grunting, and tussling among themselves.  Ensign Briana Welton was telling us about an article she read saying that human intrusion into breeding sea lion communities causes the sea lions stress and has interfered with their reproductive habits causing a population decline in some areas.  Our presence certainly caused this bunch a bit of stress if their behavior was any indication. They were fun to watch (make sure to be up wind – they have a terrible stench), but I hope we did not overly stress them.

Mike Laird, August 2, 2005

NOAA Teacher at Sea
Mike Laird
Onboard NOAA Ship Rainier
July 24 – August 13, 2005

Mission: Hydrographic Survey
Geographical Area: North Pacific
Date: August 2, 2005

Weather Data

Time: 13:00
Latitude: 55° 53.4 ̍ N
Longitude: 158˚ 50.4 ̍ W
Visibility: 10 nautical miles (nm)
Wind Direction: 225˚
Wind Speed: 10kts
Sea Wave Height: 0-1΄
Swell Wave Height: 0-1΄
Sea Water Temperature: 11.7˚ C
Sea Level Pressure: 1009.5 mb
Cloud Cover: Sky 8/8 covered; Lower level: cumulus Mid-level: altostratus High level: cirrus

Deck Crew for a Day – Part I 

One evening late last week, I checked the Plan of the Day (POD) — a schedule listing the following day’s launch assignments and ship movements.  I found that I was scheduled for an on-ship day. Teacher at Sea participants onboard the RAINIER generally follow a routine alternating between fieldwork out in the launches and days onboard the ship.  The on-ship days are intended to give us time to interview crewmembers, research areas of interest, and prepare logs detailing our experiences and learning.

So when I saw that I would be onboard the following day, I made arrangements with Jim Kruger the Deck Chief to be a member of the deck crew for a day.  While anchored in the work area, the deck crew’s typical day begins with the responsibility of getting all launches scheduled for fieldwork prepared and deployed.  For each boat going out this entails:

  • removal of the tie-downs securing the launch in its berth
  • lowering the launch (done with a piece of equipment called a gravity davit – a system of pulleys, cables, and hooks operated by a motor)
  • securing the launch for the safe loading of:
      1. personnel,
      2. equipment: the CTD sensor used in taking a cast of the water column (see log for Day 3, Wednesday, July 27) and personal gear,
      3. and – maybe most important – the food and drinks prepared by the galley for lunch and snacks
  • releasing the launch from the hooks (one on the bow – “For clear!” and one on the stern – “Aft clear!”) used to raise and lower it with the gravity davit
  • starting the boat’s motor
  • and finally, releasing the launch’s bow and stern lines, so the coxswain can  radio in and declare, “We are away!”

The deck crew must work as a team to ensure that all of this happens safely, quickly, and efficiently.  It is pretty impressive to see four to five launches mobilized and away from the ship in less than thirty minutes!  On my first day (actually my only day) on the job, I was given the job of manning the stern line.  Of course I had a “real” deck crewmember by my side giving me instructions and pointers and ready to step in if things reached a crisis point.

The stern line actually serves two purposes: 1) to make sure the launch does not swing back and forth too much while it is being lowered into the water, and 2) to work with the bowline to hold the boat securely alongside the RAINIER until it is ready to cast off. It takes quick, nimble hands (along with a few pointers on useful techniques from my partner and the Captain) to quickly release and secure the lines to the cleats along the ship’s railing. It is also encouraged that one perform these tasks without getting hands and fingers caught or getting the line all tangled up.  I preformed my duties as a rookie would and successfully helped get all the launches on their way!  It seems like we have done a lot already this morning it must be getting late.  What?  It’s only 8:27!

To be continued.

Personal Log 

Hey all you sun junkies out there! Alaska in the summer is the place to be!  We are currently enjoying almost seventeen hours of sunlight a day – sunrise 6:43 and sunset

10:38. This provides a lot of time for outdoor activities – we were out fishing at 10:30 last night. Finally had to turn the deck lights on at about 11:30, so we could finish cleaning our fish. Of course, all this fun in the sun depends on cooperation from the weather. Heavy clouds, fog and rain – not uncommon in our current location – tend to put a damper on the sunshine.  So we’ll live large and enjoy every moment we have for as long as it lasts!

Mike Laird, August 1, 2005

NOAA Teacher at Sea
Mike Laird
Onboard NOAA Ship Rainier
July 24 – August 13, 2005

Mission: Hydrographic Survey
Geographical Area: North Pacific
Date: August 1, 2005

Weather Data

Time: 13:00
Latitude: 55° 53.4 ̍ N
Longitude: 158˚ 50.4 ̍ W
Visibility: 10 nautical miles (nm)
Wind Direction: 225˚
Wind Speed: 10kts
Sea Wave Height: 0-1΄
Swell Wave Height: 0-1΄
Sea Water Temperature: 11.7˚ C
Sea Level Pressure: 1009.5 mb
Cloud Cover: Sky 8/8 covered; Lower level: cumulus Mid-level: altostratus High level: cirrus

Science and Technology Log 

Operating the RAINIER in port—as she transits from site to site, and as she lies at anchor acting as home base for the survey operations—requires that each of the ship’s “departments” functions efficiently with a small margin for error.  When things do go wrong, they must be handled using the resources available on the ship so that operations continue with as little down time as possible.  Perhaps the greatest resource onboard the RAINIER is her personnel.  Situations, like those listed below, continually arise and require those involved to demonstrate patience, innovation, problem solving abilities and determination:

  • A cable getting caught in one of the pulleys on a gravity davit just after it has been used to lower a survey launch at 8:00 to begin its day of echo sounding. The cable must be replaced and the davit operational by the time the launch returns at 16:30.
  • A crack in the hull of a launch (welded and “fixed” while the RAINIER was in port for three days in Kodiak) is allowing water into the launch at the rate of about a gallon an hour. The engineering people use some magic red goop to temporarily stop the leak until a permanent solution can be devised.
  • Electronic equipment is very temperamental (cables jiggle loose during transits through rough seas, components can overheat, software glitches rear their heads, etc.) and continually requires TLC to keep it happy and functioning.
  • Established, recognized Differential Global Positioning Systems (latitude and longitude data) and primary control stations (tide data) may not provide data that meets required specifications (because of their distance from the work area, topographic features, etc) necessitating the installation of temporary DGPS and tide station sites.

As a crew member, you never know what is going to come up and must always be willing and prepared to meet unforeseen challenges!

Personal Log 

Last night, after a day of recording data on one of the survey launches, six of us had a chance to take one of the skiffs and go do a little fishing.  Our primary target was halibut.  We motored out to a site scouted earlier in the day during our survey ops, dropped our lines and began jigging right on the bottom.  It wasn’t long before I felt a tugging on my line, began reeling in, and pulled up a baby halibut (or “but” as my companions more versed in these matters call them).  Not wanting to be accused as a cradle robber, I released it. I dropped my line again and after a few minutes of jigging, felt the tug, and reeled in a larger halibut (maybe a 15 pounder – I know technically still a baby).  I released it also, because my companions assure me, “It’s still early you’ll get a bigger one.” I didn’t – of course. However, I did have success (a silver salmon, and four sea cod – I kept these). I also hooked a pea cod, an Irish Lord and two other small halibut – I didn’t keep these. Fun times!